Repair of Equipment

Restoration of a broken, damaged, or failed device, piece of equipment, part, or property to an acceptable operating or usable condition or state.

Reference:  http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/repair.html#ixzz3pGAgty60)

The frequency and nature of scheduled maintenance/repair should be determined through risk assessment, taking full account of:

·       the manufacturer’s recommendations.

·       the intensity of use.

·       operating environment (e.g. the effect of temperature, corrosion, weathering).

·       user knowledge and experience.

·       the risk to health and safety from any foreseeable failure or malfunction.

·       The requirements for regular and authenticated calibration.

Safety-critical parts of work equipment may need a higher and more frequent level of attention than other items, which can be reflected within any maintenance program. Breakdown maintenance, undertaken only after faults or failures have occurred, will not be suitable where significant risk will arise from the continued use of the work equipment.

The manufacturer’s instructions should describe what maintenance is required to keep the equipment safe and how this can be done safely. These instructions should always be followed, unless there are justifiable reasons for not doing so (e.g. where more frequent maintenance is necessary, due to intense use, adverse environmental conditions or when other experience shows this need). Maintenance on a less frequent basis than the manufacturer’s recommendation should be subject to careful risk assessment and the reasons for doing so should be reviewed at appropriate intervals. For example, where there is already an inspection regime, perhaps for lightly used equipment, less frequent maintenance may be justified because of the condition monitoring already provided by the inspection program.

There is no requirement to keep a maintenance log, although it is recommended for high-risk equipment. Maintenance logs can provide useful information for the future planning of maintenance, as well as informing maintenance personnel of previous action taken. However, if you have a maintenance log, you must keep it up to date.

Reference: www.hse.gov.uk/work-equipment-machinery/maintenance.htm